WE LOVE ENGLAND GUIDE TO EAST DEVON

Quite different in character from other areas of Devon, East Devon has a timeless charm about it, and no shortage of hidden gems waiting to be discovered. Whilst the coast offers some of the more obvious appeal, inland you’ll find beautiful scenery, interesting market towns, charming villages with traditional thatched cottages, and plenty of room in not just one, but two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

One of the East Devon coastline’s most important aspects is that it makes up a key part of the UNESCO designated Jurassic Coast, a 90 mile stretch of geologically important coastline which runs from the town of Exmouth into the neighbouring county of Dorset. One community after another sits nestled along this coastline, each with their own identity and well worth exploration.

The area is largely unspoilt by overdevelopment, and a great way to explore it is on foot, either using the South West Coast Path, or along one of the many inland trails, including the East Devon Way, a 40 mile trail that winds its way through the untouched landscape, passing through eight villages and crossing five rivers. For lovers of peace, quiet, and plenty to see and do, East Devon is the ideal destination.

Beer And Branscombe

Beer And Branscombe


Two charming and pretty communities await the traveller as they wind their way along the narrow roads near the East Devon coast.  The villages of Beer, and its smaller neighbour, Branscombe, are worth visiting in part just for the pleasure of walking or driving through them, such is the inviting look of the old buildings with their displays of colourful flowers.  And at the bottom of each respective village’s valley, attractive and unspoilt beaches await.

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Budleigh Salterton

Budleigh Salterton


Well known for its long beach with its fat, round pebbles that were formed millions of years ago, as they tumbled down rivers from long since gone mountains, Budleigh Salterton has a gentle character about it that makes it appealing to those seeking a certain old world charm.  A good range of accommodation, shops, galleries, and eateries, however, ensure that it’s moved with the times, and makes for an appealing destination for the visitor.

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Exmouth

Exmouth


A small fishing village until the early 18th Century, Exmouth, as its name suggests, lies at the mouth of the River Exe.  Thanks to its position with splendid sandy beaches and beautiful surrounding coastal scenery, the village eventually became one of the earliest seaside resorts in Devon, and these days offers all the facilities that a visitor is looking for when taking their classic English beach holiday.

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Honiton

Honiton


Once a major stopping place on the great Roman road, Fosse Way, which ran from Lincoln to Exeter, Honiton these days is an attractive market town that many a visitor will stop at as they journey into the southwest of England.  Famous for its Honiton lace, this industry was first brought to the town by Flemish immigrants in the 16th century, and reinvigorated by Queen Victoria in the 19th century when she insisted on wearing Honiton lace on her wedding day!

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Ottery St Mary

Ottery St Mary


A small town, but fascinating none the less, Ottery St Mary is a delightful place to visit for an array of different reasons.  Aside from the generally nice aesthetic of this ancient town, with narrow streets and elegant Georgian buildings, there is the magnificent 14th Century church, the unique Tar Barrels in November, and the nearby Cadhay Manor, one of the finest manor houses in the country.

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Sidmouth

Sidmouth


Like so many of the resorts on the south coast of England, Sidmouth benefitted greatly from the Napoleonic wars of the late 18th and early 19th Century which denied the leisured classes access to their favourite resorts on the continent.  It grew from an obscure fishing village into the grand and stylish resort that it is today, with handsome Georgian buildings, beautifully cared for parks, its broad pebbly beach, all backed by its dramatic red sandstone cliffs.

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WLE RECOMMENDATIONS IN east devon

Hotel and Guest House Accommodation header image

WLE logoAccommodation


There’s a wonderful flavour to many of the accommodations in East Devon, a kind of throwback to a bygone era of 1950s English tourism, where hotels and smaller lodgings offered a reliable combination of elegance, comfort, and courtesy.  Thankfully, these places have kept up with the times, and wi... see more
Attractions and things to do

WLE logoThings to do


Exploring East Devon on foot is a great way to really get under the skin of this wonderful area, whether it’s atop the dramatic coastal path, through some of the charming villages and towns, or along one of the fabulous walking trails that criss-crosses this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.  O... see more
Food and drink

WLE logoFood and drink


There’s an excellent selection of eateries in East Devon, from 5-star fine dining establishments and seafood restaurants, to gastropubs and country inns, so whatever budget a person has, there’s something for everyone.  If on a day out, the visitor will find a hospitable establishment to enjoy ... see more

USEFUL INFORMATION ABOUT east devon

East Devon has no shortage of hidden gems to be discovered. From the UNESCO designated Jurassic Coast to beautiful scenery and charming villages with traditional thatched cottages.

East Devon by Car

As you approach Exeter on the M5 motorway southbound, various junctions will direct you to the East Devon region. If you’re travelling from London or the South East via the more scenic M3/A303/A30 route, take junctions off the A303 or A30 for East Devon.

East Devon by Bus

Please check the following websites for best options for traveling to East Devon.

National Express

Stagecoach 

Travel Line

East Devon by Train

Please visit National Rail or Trainline for information on train times and booking tickets.

East Devon by Plane

Exeter International Airport is the nearest airport. Please check website for all current information.