WE LOVE ENGLAND GUIDE TO DEVON

Sometimes considered to be England’s great all-rounder, Devon is a county with a seemingly endless list of things to see and do.  There are two coastlines, north and south, offering beautiful sandy beaches, spectacular scenery, and fabulous walks along the clifftops.  Both Dartmoor and Exmoor National Park provide outstanding opportunities for lovers of the outdoors, and the remains of ancient civilisations can be witnessed first-hand.  Historically fascinating cities and towns make for great bases from which to explore.  Charming villages and an abundance of thatched cottages nestled amongst the rolling green hills and beautiful woodlands await the traveller around every corner.  Variety is the spice of life in Devon!

One of the largest counties in England, there’s more than enough room for everyone in Devon.  A vast network of over 6000 miles of roads means that it’s possible to venture deep into the soul of this wonderful county, and the 618 churches suggest just how many communities there are waiting to be discovered.  The layers of history are fascinating, from the Bronze Age and Medieval periods on Dartmoor and in other locations, to the fishing traditions on the coasts, where many a famous explorer set sail from.

With exceptional links to literature, including Devon’s very own Agatha Christie, bountiful nature, beautiful gardens, and Devon’s most famous culinary delight, the Devonshire cream tea (jam on top please!), a lifetime isn’t long enough to discover all that’s on offer here.

With a broad array of long-established resorts and a thriving tourism industry, Devon is regarded around England and further beyond as not only a most agreeable place to live in, but a wonderful destination for a holiday.

South Devon

South Devon


Providing a fantastic combination of mile upon mile of varied coastline, including dozens of beaches, lush green hills and gorgeous winding rivers, there’s enough room for everyone in South Devon, no matter what their reason for being in this part of the World.  Considered a favourite area for people looking to relocate down to the southwest of England, South Devon is also a perfect destination for holiday makers.

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Dartmoor National Park

Dartmoor National Park


When Steven Spielberg, whilst filming Warhorse, praised Dartmoor National Park for “its abundance of natural beauty”, commenting that he was “stunned” by the landscape that lay before him, he was reflecting what both locals and visitors alike experience when they come to this special place.  368 square miles in size, it’s one of England’s great wildernesses, and an outdoor lover’s ultimate playground.

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Plymouth

Plymouth


Famous for the fact that on Friday 19th July 1588, Sir Francis Drake was playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe when he was told that the Spanish Armada was approaching (of course, he insisted that he finish his game before sailing off to intercept the enemy ships!), Plymouth’s history revolves largely around the sea.  The largest city in Devon, it’s also where the Mayflower set sail from in 1620 when bound for America.

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Exeter

Exeter


Steeped in over 2000 years of history, Exeter is a lively and thriving city with a majestic cathedral, many fine old buildings and a safe, welcoming atmosphere that makes it attractive to the visitor.  A university city and Devon’s capital, Exeter is an active place to be throughout the year, with no shortage of live performance, exhibitions, and festivals taking place.

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East Devon

East Devon


Quite different in character from other areas of Devon, East Devon has a timeless charm about it, and no shortage of hidden gems waiting to be discovered. Whilst the coast offers some of the more obvious appeal, inland you’ll find beautiful scenery, interesting market towns, charming villages with traditional thatched cottages, and plenty of room in not just one, but two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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North Devon

North Devon


Offering a glorious stretch of coastline with breath-taking cliffs, powerful seas and long sandy beaches, combined with rolling hills and valleys further inland, plus Exmoor National Park, North Devon holds broad appeal to visitors looking for a great all-round experience.  Parts of North Devon have a wild romanticism to them, and it’s easy to get off the beaten track when staying in this beautiful area.

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WLE RECOMMENDATIONS IN devon

Hotel and Guest House Accommodation header image

WLE logoAccommodation


Being such a long-established destination for tourists, Devon caters quite fabulously for the accommodation wants of any kind of visitor, no matter what their preference or budget.  This is a large county, by English standards, with a diverse array of destination type, and the expectation of the vi... see more
Attractions and things to do

WLE logoThings to do


It is sometimes said that Devon is England’s most diverse county, with an endless array of things to see and do, something, in fact for everyone, no matter where their interests lay.  With tourism being such a prominent industry in this spacious county, it has been well geared up to entertain vis... see more
Food and drink

WLE logoFood and drink


In recent years, Devon has contributed significantly to the upsurge in approval for the food and drink that is on offer in England.  Not only has it dawned on the locals that they produce some of the finest meat, seafood, vegetables and fruit from both the land and sea, but the chefs here have work... see more

USEFUL INFORMATION ABOUT devon

Bordering Cornwall in the southwest of England, the county of Devon is the perfect destination to explore. Featuring two of England’s National Parks in Dartmoor and Exmoor, spectacular coastlines, medieval towns and idyllic villages, Devon is not to be missed.

Devon by Car

The M5 motorway southbound is the main road access into Devon. Choose the relevant M5 links from Bristol, Cardiff, Birmingham and all points along the M4 corridor from London.

For an alternative scenic route from London and the South East take the M3/A303/A30.

Devon by Bus

National Express operate coach services to Devon from cities throughout the UK. 

Devon by Train

Travelling to Devon by train is an easy and relaxing alternative if you want to leave the car behind. The main line from London and the north makes stops in all the main stations within Devon.

Please visit National Rail or Trainline for information on train times and booking tickets.

Devon by Plane

Exeter International Airport is centrally located in Devon and operates daily international and internal flights. 

Please visit Exeter International Airport website for all current information.

Situated approx 1 hour north of Devon is Bristol International Airport which is a bigger airport and will provide more options.

 

Exeter Airport –

Train connections – You will need to take a taxi or bus service from the airport terminal to either Exeter St Davids or Exeter Central train stations. Please check the websites for up to date train services and times.

Bus connections – Stagecoach provides a variety of bus services directly from Exeter Airport.

Car rental – There are a number of car rental services within the airport. 

 

Bristol Airport –

Train connections – There is regular bus service from the airport terminal which takes you directly to Bristol Temple Mead train station in approximately 30m. Please check National Rail or Trainline for train services to Devon. 

Bus connections – Stagecoach provide a service from Bristol Airport to Devon which includes stops at Exeter and Plymouth.

Car rental – There are a number of car rental services within the airport.